Web Sites for Children and Youth

Netsmartz
www.netsmartz.org
NetSmartzĀ® is an interactive, educational safety resource from the National Center for Missing & Exploited ChildrenĀ® (NCMEC) and Boys & Girls Clubs of America (BGCA) for children aged 5 to 17, parents, guardians, educators, and law enforcement that uses age-appropriate, 3-D activities to teach children how to stay safer on the Internet.

ALA Great Web Sites for Kids
www.ala.org
From the American Library Association and the Association for Library Service to Children comes Great Web Sites for Kids. Links to websites that cover topics such as: Animals, the Arts, History, Literature, and Math.

Find good books to read, including Newbery and Caldecott Award Winners, at the American Library Association site. This site includes information about authors, KidsConnect (for help locating all the information online), and educational games.

Awesome Library
www.awesomelibrary.org
Awesome Library organizes the Web with 33,000 carefully
reviewed resources, including the top 5 percent in education.

Alaska Teen Media Institute
www.alaskateenmedia.org
ATMI’s mission is to provide teens with the tools and training needed to produce stories and with the opportunity for their stories – told in their own voices – to be shared with Alaskans through a variety of media.

Wired Kids
www.wiredkids.org
The World’s Largest Internet Safety, Help and Education Organization

Don’t Believe the Type
tcs.cybertipline.com
Millions of teenagers go online every day, and most are safe. The way to stay safer is to understand the dangers and follow some simple rules to help you steer clear of trouble. Don’t Believe the Type offers information and tips for safe internet use for teens – on the web, in chatrooms, on social networking sites, while instant messaging, and through email.

WiredSafety.org
www.wiredsafety.org
WiredSafety is dedicated to helping protect children in cyberspace. It does this by a combination of educational programs, awareness and prevention and one-to-one help delivered to its core audiences of parents, grandparents and caregivers, schools and community groups, law enforcement and school resource officers, as well as the children, tweens and teens

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